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Sudan

Disability activists Sudan

Supporting Disability Activists in Sudan.

Learn more about our work in Sudan and meet some of the inspiring activists we work with.

Sudan's history of conflict has made it difficult for disabled people to prosper.

Sometimes hidden away, disabled people often depend on begging to survive.

In the early 1970’s, people with disabilities started to form small activist groups. The groups grew in size and became a powerful source of social connection for disabled people. However, the groups had no clear strategies for tackling the structural issues preventing positive, long term change.

That's where ADD International came in. We began supporting disability activists to develop plans that would help them work effectively to access services and overcome the legal, social and physical barriers that prevent disabled people from being included in society.

KEY ISSUES WE WORK ON

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Women's Empowerment

We partner with female disability activists to strengthen their organisations and provide small grants to start grassroots businesses.

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Inclusive Education

We partner with disability activists to encourage disabled children to go to school, and provide schools and teachers with the resources they need to give each child the best education possible.

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Economic Empowerment

We work with disability activists to make sure disabled people can access jobs, micro-finance and loans to boost their independence and economic wellbeing.

A visually impaired woman smiling into the camera in Sudan

Empowering female disability activists.

Read how we are supporting disabled women in Sudan to claim their rights and strengthen their organisations.

Meet the Activists

Itidal, Sudan

Itidal, Sudan

When Itidal was 13, she caught a rare disease which affected her legs. She withdrew from everyone and went to live alone. When disability activists came to visit her at home, it brought hope where there had been none.

Tayba, Sudan

Tayba, Sudan

Tayba has a hearing impairment. In Sudan, there is no government support for the deaf. Tayba found community and support through a local group of activists and now is earning the money to help contribute to her family.

Let's build movements together.

Millions of disabled people in Africa and Asia are still condemned to a life of poverty and exclusion. Right now, organisations of disability activists are working to fight discrimination and ensure every disabled person gets a fighting chance at living their best life. They urgently need your support.